ETHICS

Division of Arts and Sciences
Endicott College
Beverly, Massachusetts

Course No.:
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PHL 104
ETHICS
3
None
Spring, 2012
T-Th 11:00-12:20

Laurence E. Heglar, PhD.
CIS Faculty Office
676.406.071
lheglar@endicott.edu
M-W after class
http://www.institutobios.org/courses/ethics.htm
Catalog Description:
This course is an investigation into the foundations and criteria for making ethical decisions. What constitutes moral behavior? What is value and its importance? How can one make an impact on issues that are "global" in nature?

Course Objectives:
This course will introduce you to some of the most significant ways of thinking about ethics. At the completion of this course the student should be able to:
  1. ask certain questions about how one ought to live, who we should be, and what we should do- both generally, and in certain applied situations.
  2. see how film, art, and literature can be significant resources as we think about ethical and moral issues.
  3. develop critical reading and thinking skills through engagement with classical and contemporary ethical texts.
  4. converse and reflect on ethical and philosophical issues.
  5. achieve better self-expression and clarity in writing.
  6. become sensitive to ethical issues in business.
Required Text: Velasquez, M.G. (2012). Business Ethics: Concepts and Cases (7th ed.). New Jersey; Prentice Hall.
Addtional Readings: In addition to the text, additional readings will be assigned throughout the course.

Evaluation Methods
Midterm exam: 30%
Final exam: 30%
Case Studies 40%

Exams will cover material covered in lecture, text and additional readings.

Grading Policy:

      Percentage      Grade
      93-100             A
      89-92               A-
      86-88               B+
      80-85               B
      75-79               B-
      70-74               C+
      65-69               C
      55-64               D
      54 or less          F

Teaching/Learning Strategies

This course will be lecture and discussion oriented. Students are expected to have read the material and any assigned case material prior to coming to class. The assigned cases will be related to tools and concepts previously discussed in your text or lecture, and students are expected to utilize these tools and concepts in their presentations and discussions.

Case Study Analysis: Students will be required to write individual and group Case Study Analyses. The timing, format and schedule for these case studies will be determined.

Supportive web sites: As part of your assignment on certain days, you should use the link on the Course Syllabus to peruse the selected web site pertaining to the day's topic. The Syllabus contains notes on certain topics, as well as study guides. These may be downloaded by right-clicking on the links.

Schedule of Topics and Assignments

This schedule of topics is subject to change. Updates will be made on the course syllabus web site (see above). If a student misses class the assignments for the next class will be posted there.

DATETOPICREADING
Jan. 17 What is Ethics?
The Developmental Origins of Morality
Are you in favor of same-sex marriage?
Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Download article: A Framework for Thinking Ethically
Jan. 19 Basic Principles
Relativism vs. Absolutism
Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Kohlberg's Stages of Moral Development
Study Guide for Chapter 1
Napster Case questions assigned
Jan. 24 Approaches to Ethics Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Napster case questions due
Jan. 26 Ethics and Business Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Movie: The Corporation, Part 1
Jan. 31 Ethics and Business Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Movie: The Corporation, Part 2
Feb. 2 Ethics and Business Text, Ch. 1 Ethics and Business
Movie: The Corporation, Part 3
Feb. 7 The Greek Virtues Text, Ch. 2, Ethical Principles in Business, pp. 108-114
Notes on Aristotle's Theory of Virtues
Study Guide for Chapter 2
Feb. 9 Natural Rights
   Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau
Text, Ch. 2, Ethical Principles in Business, pp. 90-98
Web site: Universal Declaration of Human Rights - U.N. 1948
Notes for Natural Rights
Feb. 14 Duty - Kant
Utilitarianism
Text, Ch. 2, Ethical Principles in Business, pp.98-105; pp. 74-90
Study Guide for Duty Ethics
Study Guide for Utilitarianism
Feb. 16 Justice & Fairness
An Ethics of Caring
Text, Ch. 2 Ethical Principles in Business, pp. 105-109
Notes on the application of ethical theories
Justice Study Guide
Phillip Morris Executive Summary Assigned
How to Write an Executive Summary
Feb. 21 Economic Systems & Ethics Text, Ch. 3 The Business System: Government, Markets, & International Trade
Study Guide for Chapter 3
Phillip Morris Executive Summary Due
Feb. 23 Economic Systems & Ethics Text, Ch. 3 The Business System: Government, Markets, & International Trade
Feb. 28 Midterm Exam
March 1 Formal and Informal Logical Fallacies Handouts
March 6 Formal and Informal Logical Fallacies Handouts
March 8 Ecology & Consumers Text, Ch. 5, Ethics and the Environment
Unocal Executive Summary Assigned
Study Guide for Chapter 5
March 13 Ecology & Consumers Text, Ch. 5, Ethics and the Environment
Study Guide for Chapter 5
March 15 Marketing Text, Ch. 6, The Ethics of Consumer Production and Marketing
Unocal Executive Summary Due
March 20 Marketing Text, Ch. 6, The Ethics of Consumer Production and Marketing
Study Guide for Chapter 6
Asarco Case Study Assigned
March 22 Movie: Arsarco Case Study Due
March 27 Movie:
Ethics and Medicine/Biotechnology
Article: To be announced
March 29 Ethics and Medicine/Biotechnology Article: To be announced
March 30 - April 8 Spring Break
April 12 Ethics and Medicine/Biotechnology Article: To be announced
April 17 Individuals and Organizations Text, Ch. 8, The Individual in the Organization
Study Guide for Chapter 8
April 19 Individuals and Organizations Text, Ch. 8, The Individual in the Organization
April 24 Movie: To be announced
April 26 Movie: To be announced
May 3 Review
May 7-9 Final Exams


COURSE POLICIES


Attendance Policy:
The CIS faculty and administration believe that attendance is critical to understanding and applying knowledge and skills taught. The policy is that students must attend all classes. If a student has four absences the final grade will be lowered by half a grade, (for example, a B will become a B-). After every two additional absences, the grade will be lowered by another half a grade. (After six absences, the final grade will go from a B to a C+).

Punctuality:
Attendance will be taken when the instructor arrives in class. Any student entering after attendance is taken will be counted absent. (There is no 10-minute rule).

Cellular phones:
Any student who uses his/her cellular phone during class will be asked to leave the class immediately and will not be allowed to return to class that day.

Make-up work:
Any student who finds it necessary to miss an exam should inform the instructor prior to the exam. Only official excuses will be accepted. Make-up tests will be considerably harder than the original, so it is in the student's best interest to take them at the scheduled time. Executive and case studies will be penalized 25% for each day they are late. If a student turns in an assignment late, they must have someone in administration intial the report and the date it was turned in.All assignments must be turned in before the next case is assigned, regardless of how many points they are worth for the student. No grade will be awarded to students who do not turn in all assignments.

Food and drinks:
Students may only consume water during class but no other kind of drinks and no food may be brought to class.

Breaks:
Officially permitted breaks are scheduled 10 minutes before and after each class. Students may not leave the classroom during the scheduled class.

Academic Honesty Policy:
Academic honesty is an expectation of all students. Violations of academic honesty are serious transgressions in an academic setting. Violations undermine the academic integrity and mission of the College for all members of the community.

Plagiarism is a violation of academic honesty. Plagiarism is the presentation of someone elsešs words, images, or ideas as onešs own. Plagiarism includes: copying phrases, sentences, or passages from sources without quotation marks and source citations; paraphrasing or summarizing someone elsešs ideas without acknowledging the source; excessive use of paraphrasing, even when sources are cited; handing in a paper that has been written by or copied from another person or source. Plagiarism is a serious offense. A faculty member may handle plagiarism as he or she sees fit or the faculty member may refer the student's paper to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. Plagiarism may result in failure of the course or dismissal from the College. Cheating is a violation of academic honesty. A faculty member may handle cheating as he or she sees fit or the faculty member may refer the matter to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. Cheating on exams, tests, quizzes or any other assignment may result in failure of the course or dismissal from the College.

Unless the faculty member submits the alleged violation to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution in the first instance, a student must appeal a decision of a faculty member on a violation of this policy to the Dean of the School where the violation occurred. The Dean may accept or reject the faculty memberšs decision, or may simply refer the matter to the Academic Honesty Committee. The student or faculty member may appeal the decision of the Dean to the College Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. The Academic Honesty Committee shall review any matter referred to it and shall make its recommendations to the Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College. The Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College shall make the final decision on matters referred to the Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College by the Academic Honesty Committee.



Selected Notes


Logical Fallacies (Word .doc)
Logical Fallacies (.html file)
The Air Brake - Case Study