ECOLOGY SYLLABUS

Division of Arts and Sciences
Endicott College
Beverly, Massachusetts

Course No.:
Course Title:
Credits:
Prerequisites:
Semester, Year:
Class times:

Faculty:
   Office Location:
   Telephone:
   E-Mail:
   Office Hours:
   Web Page:
BIO 130
Ecology
4
None
Summer, 2010
Group 1 - 9:30-11:30; Group 2 - 11:45-13:45

Laurence E. Heglar, PhD.; Mercedes Quesada, Ph.D.
CIS
676.406.071
laurence_heglar@schiller.edu
By Appointment
http://www.institutobios.org/courses/
Catalog Description: Examines the relationshps between organisms and between organisms and their environment. This class provides an overview of ecology for the informed citizen, and also a good foundation for futher work in ecology, oceanography and environmental studies.

Course Objectives:
At the completion of this course the student should be able to:
  1. Understand basic principles of ecology
  2. Practice laboratory and field techniques in ecology
  3. Have an appreciation for and ability to critically think about ecological issues presented by the media
  4. Apply ecological principles to examine environmental problems such as human population growth, pollution, and loss of biodiversity
  5. Develop communication skills (oral and written) in expressing views on ecological issues.
Evaluation Methods
This course consists of lecture (3 cr.) and lab (1 cr.). Each part will be graded independently.
  Lecture:
    Midterm exam: 50%
    Final exam: 50%
  Lab
     Assignments: 100%

Attendance Policy:
Attendance is expected at every class and extra lab fieldtrips. Attendance will be taken every class. For every two classes missed, the penalty is the loss of a half of a grade point (e.g., A to A-, A- to B+, B+ to B, B to B-, B- to C+ etc.).
Note: Students who arrive late may be counted absent. However, if a student arrives late and class has begun, it is better to enter the class so as not to miss important material. Also, students should not leave class without asking permission. Any student doing so will be counted absent.

Academic Honesty:
Students are expected to abide by the academic honesty policy of Endicott College. Students shall exhibit honesty in all academic endeavors, cheating in any form is not tolerated, nor is helping someone to cheat. Work submitted is taken as a guarantee that it is the student's own, except where properly credited to another. Violations include giving or receiving aid on an exam, report or project where otherwise prohibited, fraud, plagiarism or forgery of any record, or any deceptive act in connection with academic work. Any breach of the academic honesty policy will result in the failure of the assignment. Two breaches will result in dismissal and failure of the class.

Required Readings:
Miller, G.T. (2006) Living in the Environment (15th ed.). Pacific Grove, CA., Brooks/Cole.

Recommended Readings:
There will be additional readings assigned throughout the course.

Supportive web sites:
As part of your assignment on certain days, you should use the link on the Course Syllabus to peruse the selected web site pertaining to the day's topic.


READING AND TOPIC SCHEDULE

Your instructor reserves the right to change the readings according to new and interesting topics discovered by students and instructor alike. Students are responsible for text material regardless of whether or not it is discussed in class. Exams will cover material covered in both lecture and text.

Students should consider the internet links listed below to be required reading.


  DATE  TOPIC READING

Week 1

May 24 Environmental Problems and Their Causes Text, Ch. 1 - Environmental Problems, Their Causes and Sustainability
Text, Supplement 6, p. S25 - Norse, Greenland, Sumerian and Iclandic Civilizations
Check out your Ecological Footprint
May 25 Environmental Problems and Their Causes Video: Home
Text, Ch. 1 - Environmental Problems, Their Causes and Sustainability
Notes for Chapter 1
  Supplementary Websites
Human Evolution
Human Fossils
Online Video: Becoming Human Documentary and
Origins of Humankind Website and
Smithsonian Institution Human Origins Site
May 26 Human History Human Evolution Lecture
May 27 Science and Methods Text, Ch. 2 - Science, Systems, Matter and Energy
Regulative Principles


Week 2

May 31 Ecosystems Text, Ch. 3 - Ecosystems: What are they and how do they work?
June 1 Ecosystems Text, Ch. 3 - Ecosystems: What are they and how do they work?
June 2 Evolution & Biodiversity Text, Ch. 4 - Evolution & Biodiversity
Notes on Evolution
June 3 Evolution & Biodiversity Text, Ch. 4 - Evolution & Biodiversity
June 4 Midterm exam Chapters 1,2,3,4


Week 3

June 7 Climates and Biomes Text, Ch. 5 - Climate and Terrestrial Biodiversity
June 8 Climates and Biomes Text, Ch. 5 - Climate and Terrestrial Biodiversity
June 9 Aquatic Ecology Text, Ch. 6 - Aquatic Biodiversity
June 10 - Holiday    


Week 4

June 14 Community Processes: Species Interaction and Succession Text, Ch. 8 - Community Ecology
June 15 Community Processes: Species Interaction and Succession Text, Ch. 8 - Community Ecology
June 16 Population DynamicsText, Ch. 9 - Population Ecology
June 17 Population Dynamics Text, Ch. 9 - Population Ecology


Week 5

 
June 21 Human Population Growth Text, Ch. 10 - Applying Population Ecology: The Human Population and Its Impact
Population Pyramids by Country
June 22 Human Population Growth Text, Ch. 10 - Applying Population Ecology: The Human Population and Its Impact
June 23 Global Climate Change Text, Ch. 21 - Climate Change and Ozone Loss
Video: An Inconvenient Truth - Update
Video: Global Climate Change in Spain
June 24 Global Climate Change Text, Ch. 21 - Climate Change and Ozone Loss
Video: An Inconvenient Truth - Update
Video: Global Climate Change in Spain
The Most Terrifying Video You'll Ever See
June 25Final Exam


Internet Resources


There are two sets of Internet Resources relevant to this course that you should be aware of. The first is the website for the textbook, G.T. Miller's Living in the Environment, 15th ed. The site has study aids such as practice quizes and flash cards for each chapter in the text, as well as hyperlinks to chapter-related topics. Doing the chapter quizes on the website will help you on the midterm and final exams I give in class, and I may make specific assigments from time to time from the exercises there.
The second site is the Life-Sciences/Environment Research Page on the instructor's personal website which has dozens of links to all sorts of environment-related topics.