GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 100 - Endicott College / CIS
Course Syllabus
Spring 2011

Instructor: Laurence E. Heglar, PhD
Office hours:By Appointment
Meeting times: T-Th 11:00-12:20

Location: Room C
Mobil phone: 676.406.071
E-mail: lheglar@endicott.edu

Course Description:

Psychology is concerned with the study of human behavior. In this course we will be finding out what psychologists do, how they investigate human behavior, and what is known about the kind of creatures we are. We will be looking at our capacities and potentials, how we adapt to and create the physical and social environments in which we live, and how we change during the various developmental periods of our lives. The topics covered in this course will include how our biological form influences our behavior, our perceptions and different states of consciousness, the ways in which we communicate with each other, and the possibilities for changing our behavior by means of learning experiences. We will also consider the various issues we face as infants, children, adults and in old age, and the various perspectives on personality and current therapies for effecting change in ourselves and our relationships with others.

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Describe the major perspectives and research methods in contemporary psychology.
  2. Describe physiological and psychological development.
  3. Discuss current findings in the areas of learning, memory and thinking
  4. Discuss the concepts of motivation and emotions and current research
  5. Describe the theory behind mental and personality measurement, andthe influence of developmental factors on both areas
  6. Identify different types of causal factors leading to abnormal behavior, and understand the basics of the current classification system for psychological disorders.
Required Reading:
Smith, E.E.; Nolen-Hoeksema, S.; Fredrickson, BlL.; Loftun, G.R. (2003-2010). Introduction to Psychology. San Diego, Ca: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (14th or 15th edition)

Use of the text is necessary. Either the 14th or 15th edition may be used.


Internet Resources:
This course syllabus is online at the instructor's web site: "http://www.institutobios.org". Students should click on "Course Materials." Also on this site students will find the instructor's Psychology Reference Page of internet sites in the field of psychology.

Teaching/Learning Strategies:
Class time will be spent discussing topics related to the text material assigned for that day, but students should not expect that all text material will be covered in class. Students are responsible for all assigned reading and should ask questions in class. Various handouts will be given out in class, which are also material for exams.

Evaluation Methods:
The exams will consist of multiple choice questions. Exams will not be comprehensive, but will only cover material from the chapters and lectures since the last exam. The grading for the course will be based on two exams and three lab reports. All work must be turned in to receive a grade. The total points will be distributed as follows:
Midterm exam         100 points
Final exam               100 points
Lab reports             100 points

Total              =       300 points
Grading Policy:

      Percentage      Grade
      93-100             A
      89-92               A-
      86-88               B+
      80-85               B
      75-79               B-
      70-74               C+
      65-69               C
      55-64               D
      54 or less          F

Lab Reports: Doing research and writing reports is an integral part of psychology and the other social sciences. During the course we will have several opportunities to conduct small experiments in class or at home. Three of these experiments will serve as the basis for short written lab reports by the students. The purpose of these write-ups is to give students the opportunity to learn the format of report writing in the social sciences, i.e. describing the methods used in an experiment, reporting the results, and interpreting the findings. No outside materials will be needed for these lab reports, other than the instruction booklets the instructor hands out in class. The lab report schedule is as follows:

DATE ASSIGNEDDATE DUEPOINTS
Lab report 1 Feb. 3Feb. 1020
Lab report 2 March 8March 1530
Lab report 3 April 7April 1450
The format to be followed in writing these reports will be discussed in class. Copies of the instructions for writing the reports may be downloaded as Word documents - Lab Format and Research Report. Lab reports must be typed.

Reading and Lecture Topic Schedule

DATETOPICREADING
Jan. 18 Introduction
What do psychologists do?
Psychology Knowledge Test
Ch. 1 - The Nature of Psychology
Study Guide for Chapter 1 (Word .doc)
Jan. 20 A bit of history
Philosophical questions & the 5 schools
Ch. 1 - The Nature of Psychology
Jan. 25 Doing research in psychology Ch. 1 - The Nature of Psychology
Jan. 27 Human Development
Genetics and Infancy
Ch. 3 - Psychological Development
Study Guide for Chapter 3 (Word .doc)
Feb. 1 Human Development
Childhood social, emotional and cognitive development
Ch. 3 - Psychological Development
Feb. 3 Human Development
Adolescence and Adulthood
Ch. 3 - Psychological Development
Lab 1 assigned
Feb. 8 Sleep and Dreams Ch. 6 - Consciousness
Study Guide for Chapter 6 (Word .doc)
Feb. 10 Hypnosis and Drugs Ch. 6 - Consciousness
Lab 1 assignment due
Feb. 15 Behaviorism and Learning Ch. 7 - Learning and Conditioning
The Behaviorist Manifesto by Watson (Word .doc)
Learning Study Guide
Feb. 17 Learning and Cognitive Processes Ch. 7 - Learning and Conditioning
Feb. 22 Catch Up and Review
Feb. 24 Midterm Exam Chapters 1, 3, 6, 7
March 3 Intelligence
History and Tests
Ch. 12 - Individual Differences
March 8 Intelligence Ch. 12 - Individual Differences
Lab 2 assigned (download Word .doc)
Reading: Appendix I in text
March 10 Personality - Freud Ch. 13 - Personality: The Psychoanalytic Approach
March 15 Personality - Freud Ch. 13 - Personality: The Psychoanalytic Approach
Lab 2 assignment due
March 17 Personality - Freud Ch. 13 - Personality: The Psychoanalytic Approach
March 22 Personality - The Humanists Ch. 13 - Personality
March 24 Personality Ch. 13 - Personality
March 29 Psychological Disorders Ch. 15 - Abnormal Behavior
March 31 Psychological Disorders Ch. 15 - Abnormal Behavior
April 5 Therapy Ch. 16 - Methods of Therapy
April 7 In-Class Experiment
Therapy
Ch. 16 - Methods of Therapy
Lab 3 assigned
April 12 Therapy Ch. 16 - Methods of Therapy
April 14 Social Psychology Ch. 18 - Social Interaction and Influence
Lab 3 due
April 15-24 Spring Break
April 26 Social Psychology Ch. 18 - Social Interaction and Influence
April 28 Review
May 3 - 6 Final Exam Chapters 12, 13, 15, 16, 18


COURSE POLICIES


Attendance Policy:
The CIS faculty and administration believe that attendance is critical to understanding and applying knowledge and skills taught. The policy is that students must attend all classes. If a student has four absences the final grade will be lowered by half a grade, (for example, a B will become a B-). After every two additional absences, the grade will be lowered by another half a grade. (After six absences, the final grade will go from a B to a C+).

Punctuality:
Arriving more than ten minutes late to class will be considered an absence. The student may not be allowed to enter class.

Cellular phones:
Any student who uses his/her cellular phone during class will be asked to leave the class immediately and will not be allowed to return to class that day.

Make-up work:
Any student who finds it necessary to miss an exam should inform the instructor prior to the exam. Only official excuses will be accepted. Make-up tests will be considerably harder than the original, so it is in the student's best interest to take them at the scheduled time. Lab reports will be penalized 25% for each day they are late. All reports must be turned in before the next lab is assigned, regardless of how many points they are worth for the student. No grade will be awarded to students who do not turn in all lab reports.

Food and drinks:
Students may only consume water during class but no other kind of drinks and no food may be brought to class.

Breaks:
Officially permitted breaks are scheduled 10 minutes before and after each class. Students may not leave the classroom during the scheduled class.

Academic Honesty Policy:
Academic honesty is an expectation of all students. Violations of academic honesty are serious transgressions in an academic setting. Violations undermine the academic integrity and mission of the College for all members of the community.

Plagiarism is a violation of academic honesty. Plagiarism is the presentation of someone elsešs words, images, or ideas as onešs own. Plagiarism includes: copying phrases, sentences, or passages from sources without quotation marks and source citations; paraphrasing or summarizing someone elsešs ideas without acknowledging the source; excessive use of paraphrasing, even when sources are cited; handing in a paper that has been written by or copied from another person or source. Plagiarism is a serious offense. A faculty member may handle plagiarism as he or she sees fit or the faculty member may refer the student's paper to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. Plagiarism may result in failure of the course or dismissal from the College. Cheating is a violation of academic honesty. A faculty member may handle cheating as he or she sees fit or the faculty member may refer the matter to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. Cheating on exams, tests, quizzes or any other assignment may result in failure of the course or dismissal from the College.

Unless the faculty member submits the alleged violation to the Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution in the first instance, a student must appeal a decision of a faculty member on a violation of this policy to the Dean of the School where the violation occurred. The Dean may accept or reject the faculty memberšs decision, or may simply refer the matter to the Academic Honesty Committee. The student or faculty member may appeal the decision of the Dean to the College Academic Honesty Committee for review and resolution. The Academic Honesty Committee shall review any matter referred to it and shall make its recommendations to the Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College. The Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College shall make the final decision on matters referred to the Vice President and Dean of the Undergraduate College by the Academic Honesty Committee.