SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY IN MADRID
Spring 2011

PSY 395.1

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ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Laurence E. Heglar, PhD
Monday & Wednesday
12:00 - 13:25
International Institute
By Appointment

lheglar@sumadrid.es
http://www.institutobios.org/courses.htm
676.406.071

Course Description:

The purpose of this course is to give the student an understanding of the biological, cultural and political issues alive within the field of abnormal psychology. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the major conflicting conceptualisations of abnormal psychology prevalent in the field today, as well as with the historical underpinnings of the field. Particular attention will be given to specific categories of dysfunctional behaviour as they relate to the different perspectives. Issues with respect to psychological assessment and therapeutic treatment of abnormal behaviour will also be critically discussed.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

General Learning Outcomes
  1. A greater ability to understand, adapt to, and appreciate the social conventions, norms and taboos of other societies.
  2. An enhanced understanding of oneself and one's ability to cope with life's vicissitudes.
Specific Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course, students will be able to: Basic Text: Carson, R.C., Butcher, J.N., Mineka, S. (2002-4). Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology and Modern Life, Boston, Allyn & Bacon. (relevant chapters available in a reader)

Additional Readings: Further readings will be made available in the Reader and on the course syllabus web page.

COURSE OUTLINE:

DATETOPICREADING
Jan. 26 The Story of Matthew
A Contextual Developmental Perspective
Reading:Foundations for a Perspective on Abnormal Behavior
Reading: Monte, The Deep Understanding of Normal and Abnormal Personalities
Jan. 28
Make-up day
Sanity, Structures & Developmental Transitions Erving Goffman - Introduction to Asylums
Text, Ch. 1 - Abnormal Psychology Over Time
BehaveNet: DSM-IV-TR Classification
Jan. 31 Varieties of Human Behavior
Classifying Diversity
Social History of the Insane

Text, Ch. 1 - Abnormal Psychology Over Time
Feb. 2 Causality in Biological Systems Text, Ch. 2 - Causal Factors & Viewpoints in Abnormal Psychology
Feb. 7 Self-awareness & the Unconscious Monte - Psychoanalysis: The Clinical Evidence
Text, Ch. 2 - Causal Factors & Viewpoints in Abnormal Psychology
Feb. 9 Psychodynamics of the Mind Monte - Psychoanalysis: The Clinical Evidence
Text, Ch. 2 - Causal Factors & Viewpoints in Abnormal Psychology
Feb. 14 Psychodynamics of the Mind Monte - Psychoanalysis: The Clinical Evidence
Feb. 16 Clinical Assessment & Treatments Text, Ch. 3 - Clinical Assessment and Treatment
Feb. 21 Clinical Assessment & Treatments Text, Ch. 3 - Clinical Assessment and Treatment
Feb. 23 Examination 1
Feb. 28 Anxiety & Defenses Text, Ch. 5 - Panic, Anxiety, & Their Disorders
Reading: Case Study - Phobic Behaviour in a College Student
March 2 Anxiety & Defenses Text, Ch. 5 - Panic, Anxiety, & Their Disorders
Symptoms as Compromise Formations
March 7 Anxiety & Defenses Text, Ch. 5 - Panic, Anxiety, & Their Disorders
Symptoms as Compromise Formations
March 9 Mood Disorders & Suicide
Text, Ch. 6 - Mood Disorders & Suicide
Reading: Case Study - Major Depression; I Die a Little When I Cry
March 14 Mood Disorders & Suicide
Text, Ch. 6 - Mood Disorders & Suicide
March 16 Personality Disorders Text, Ch. 9 - Personality Disorder
March 21 Personality Disorders Text, Ch. 9 - Personality Disorder
March 23 Physical Health & Eating Disorders Text, Ch. 8 - Psychological Compromises of Physical Health and Eating Disorders
Anorexia
Reading: Case Study - The Development of Anorexia Nervosa
March 28 Physical Health & Eating Disorders Text, Ch. 8 - Psychological Compromises of Physical Health and Eating Disorders
March 30 Examination II - Reports
April 4 Reports
April 6 Sexual Variants, Abuse, & Dysfunctions Text, Ch. 11 - Sexual Variants, Abuse, & Dysfunctions
April 11 Sexual Variants, Abuse, & Dysfunctions Text, Ch. 11 - Sexual Variants, Abuse, & Dysfunctions
April 18-25 Fiesta - Holy Week
April 27 Schizophrenia Text, Ch. 12 - Schizophrenias
The Schizophrenia Diaries
May 2 Schizophrenia Text, Ch. 12 - The Schizophrenias
Reading: Case Study - Chronic Schizophrenia
May 4 Schizophrenia Text, Ch. 12 - The Schizophrenias
Reading: Case Study - Chronic Schizophrenia
May 4 Final Exam 12:00 - 13:30


Methodology and Grading:

Examination 1 = 30%
Examination 2 (Report) = 30%
Final Examination = 30%
Participation = 10%

PARTICIPATION GRADE
A participation grade is assigned each class, based on a scale of 10, as follows:

    10  Prepared, active, excellent, relevant qualitative, thought provoking;
           comments and questions; helped move the discussion into new realms.
     8  Prepared, good comments and questions, helped flow of discussion
     6  Marginally prepared; active, but context of comments lacking
     4  Not prepared, passive; but in class and following along
     2  Inattentive, disruptive attention wanders, chats with others,
     0  Absent or disrespectful

Use of the Internet: The following Internet resources are available on the Internet:
Course syllabus: This syllabus is online at http://www.institutobios.org/courses.htm. This is in case you lose your paper copy, and you will need this syllabus to download additional readings for the course.
Supportive web sites: Your instructor keeps a library of psychology links on the web. To find this, just go to the above address for the course syllabus and there is a link across from the syllabus link. More information about any of the topics for this course may be found at this link.
Reports:
During the semester your instructor will assign each student a short report to be typed and presented in class. These reports will cover certain special topics. Your instructor will provide more details during the first days of the class.

Grading Table

Grade       Syracuse Grade

94 - 100    A    Sobresaliente
90 - 93      A-   Sobresaliente bajo
87 - 89      B+   Notable alto
84 - 86      B    Notable
80 - 83      B-   Notable bajo
77 - 79      C+   Aprovechado alto
70 - 76      C    Aprovechado
65 - 69      C-   Aprovechado bajo
60 - 64      D   Aprobado
59 - 0        F    Suspenso

ATTENDANCE:
Students should be prepared to take classes or participate in class-related activities Mondays through Fridays. Attendance in all courses is expected at Syracuse University. SU/Madrid class attendance requirement and policies concerning non-attendance are detailed below and on each respective course syllabus.

Following the Add deadline students may have two unexcused absences in courses that meet twice per week and one unexcused absence in courses that meet once per week, without penalty. Each unexcused absence thereafter will result in a penalty applied to the Final Grade; the penalty is the loss of a half of a grade point per unexcused absence thereafter (e.g., A to A-, A- to B+, B to B-, etc.).

Parental, friend or sweetheart visits, mossed transportation connections, mild colds, headaches or hangovers, unofficial trps away from the Study Center, etc. are not an acceptable pretext for missing class.

ACADEMIC MATERIALS POLICY
Academic Readers: We have asked all professors to put together Academic Readers (chapters, articles, webpage's, etc for their courses. Tese readers are for sale at "Graficas Santa Cruz", Calle Rafael Calvo, 40.

Textbooks in Spanish: We have asked all professors to recommend key texbooks in Spanish and you can buy these textbooks at "Libreria Pasajes" Calle Genova 4, Metro Alonso Martinez.

Textbooks in English: Some professors recommend students to buy textbooks in English and you have to borrow these from the Institue's Library or buy them at "www.amazon.co.uk".
Since most editions of the academic readers and textbooks are updated every year. Thus, none of our suppliers buy back the books or any other academic materials.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The Syracuse University Academic Integrity Policy holds students accountable for the integrity of the work they submit. Students should be familiar with the Policy and know that it is their responsibility to learn about instructor and general academic expectations with regard to proper citation of sources in written work. The policy also governs the integrity of work submitted in exams and assignments as well as the veracity of signatures on attendance sheets and other verifications of participation in class activities. Serious sanctions can result from academic dishonesty of any sort.

For more information and the complete policy, see http://academicintegrity.syr.edu

Turnitin.com Service

This class will be using Turnitin, a plagiarism prevention system. The ease of using the Internet has made it very easy for students to "cut and paste" material into papers that they are writing without proper citation. I will submit all/some/ papers that you write in this class to Turnitin, a service that identifies "matched text." I will then interpret the originality report, based on your writing capability and writing style.

Note that all submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database, solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers.

Additionally, Turnitin also has some helpful resources on preventing plagiarism that you may wish to check out: www.plagiarism.org

Plagiarism is the representation of another's words, ideas, programs, formulas, opinions or other products of work as one's own either overtly or by failing to attribute them to the true source, from the internet or otherwise, and is subject to disciplinary action as described under violations to the Syracuse University code of Student Conduct.

DISABILITY SERVICES

Students who may need academic accommodations due to a disability are encouraged to discuss their needs with the instructor at the beginning of the semester. In order to obtain authorized accommodations, students should be registered with the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 804 University Avenue, Room 309, 315-443-4498 and have an updated accommodation letter for the instructor. Accommodations and related support services such as exam administration are not provided retroactively and must be requested in advance."

For more information about services and policy, see Office of Disability Services

Syracuse University
Office of Disability Services
804 University Avenue Room 309
Syracuse, New York 13244-2330
Phone: Voice: (315) 443-4498
TDD: (315) 443-1371
E-Mail: odssched@syr.edu

CLASSROOM PROTOCOLS TO KEEP IN MIND